Hong Kong’s First Modular integrated Construction (MiC) Pioneer Project.



Location

  • Hong Kong

Client

  • The Hong Kong Science and Technology Parks Corporation (HKSTP)

Project Status

  • Scheduled for completion in 2020

Architect

  • L&O

INNOCELL at HKSTP, Hong Kong (Image courtesy of L&O)

The InnoCell at Hong Kong Science and Technology Park (HKSTP) is the first multi-story MiC project obtaining approval from the Buildings Department (BD) in Hong Kong.  WSP is appointed as the structural engineer for the project.  

MiC refers to an innovative construction method which adopts Design for Manufacturing and Assembly (DfMA) technology to allow for pre-fabrication in a factory environment followed by on-site installation of building elements.  Design for MiC follows an approach different from the conventional one, and it must comply with the Buildings Ordinance and/or other relevant requirements (e.g. PNAP ADV-36 ) issued by the BD. 

 

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Animation showing MiC

WSP successfully secured the first ever In-Principle Acceptance for a MiC system submission based on the prototype of the InnoCell.  From the statutory submissions to the fabrication and construction stages, we kept advancing the design to cope with the construction difficulties while sustaining the structural consideration already adopted.  The structural construction of this 17-storey smart-living dormitory commenced in August 2019 and is expected to complete by August 2020, the project delivery time is shorten by at least six months. 

Recently, our Innovative Modular integrated Construction (MiC) Design Approach for InnoCell won first recognition - a merit award in the Hong Kong Institution of Engineers (HKIE) Innovation Awards 2020 (Category I – An Invention). 

For densely populated cities like Hong Kong, MiC provides an effective way to create living and working space in a much quicker, more economical and sustainable manner.  It is anticipated to be adopted with increasing popularity for high-rise buildings in the future.

InnoCell prototypes at HKSTP